All of us who were present at the Slow Food/ Dante Alighieri Taste of Sardinia evening (March 2, 2018) were instantly impressed by Angela’s passion and love for her home in Sardinia.

She introduced herself wearing traditional Sardinian dress and wearing jewellery passed down to her from generations.  She showed us wonderful images of the mystical past of Sardinia and then guided us through a tasting of some of the artisan made product.

We started of course with a Vermentino which is a perfect aperitivo wine.  Along with the cannonau we tasted later it came from Pala Winery.  If you visit their site http://www.pala.it/index.php/en/ you will see how they are produced.  They are available from New farm deli and Cru bar in James street and at other shops around town.  Angela explained that the vermentino is an indigenous grape and according to recent archaeological finds may have been grown in Sardinia for thousands of years.  The cannonau on the other hand is a Grenache that has particular regional characteristics.

As an antipasto we had the pane carasau the paper-like Sardinian bread that keeps so that the shepherds can carry it while they are away with their sheep.  We ate it with Sardinian infused olive oil and pecorino cheese exactly as the shepherds would.  It is easy to see why they live so long.

Angela also talked about some of the Slow Food Presidia in Sardinia.  This is where Slow Food helps local growers to come together and protect and increase the value of the traditional produce they have been making for centuries.

After the presentation, we all went downstairs to Pizzantica where Luca Ferone had prepared a traditional Sardinian dish from the Campidano Plain in the south west of Sardinia.  Angela had brought the astisan made malloreddus from Sardinia in her luggage and Luca did a great job of preparing it.  Click on the malloreddus to get the recipe and gnochhetti sardi make a good substitute for malloreddus

We finished off with amaretti and a taste to Mirto which is a liqueur made from the fruit of Mediterranean myrtle bush.  As well as helping digestion it has medicinal qualities and is probably another contributor to the famous Sardinian longevity.

Thanks again Angela